Damaraland

Damaraland as formerly known is situated in the north-western side of Namibia. Colors and contours collide, and nowhere more magnificently than at Brandberg Mountain to the south. Amongst the rocky crevices are thousands of bushman rock paintings of which the “White Lady” is the best known. To the north at Burnt Mountain is the geological curiosity known as the Organ Pipes, silent masses of basalt rising up in perpendicular patterns. The slopes at Twyfelfontein are one of the richest collections of stone-age rock engravings in Africa.

Cut from east to west by ancient dry river courses, some of glacial origin, creating deep canyons. These riverbeds are lined with thorny acacia trees forming linear oases in the desert and so providing a lifeline of survival for a host of unexpected animals, including desert-dwelling elephant, lion and rare black rhino. Wild game of the region, are nomads, following thunder clouds which hold the hope of a bit of moisture that might be released, downwards to the barren dry land below.

In collaboration with our partners we have access to various communal concession areas in this spectacular region. Accommodation varies from luxury lodges to temporary fly camps. Hot water for a shower after a long day’s hard hunting and a freshly cooked meal on an open fire is just some of the basic luxuries to be enjoyed in the desert.

Hunting on the, gravel plains, rolling hills or the steep slopes in the eastern parts, provides for excellent hunting experiences that will create memories to last a lifetime.

Bone Collectors hunting in Damaraland

Hunting in the Damaraland - Please Note

  • The north-west of Namibia is a harsh, wild country!
  • Hunting here requires a fair level of fitness!
  • Clients intending to hunt the desert regions of Namibia will work hard for their animals!
  • A hunting safari in these areas is for the hunting experience and NOT to collect a wide range of species in a short period of time!

Clients hunting in communal conservancies in Namibia can be assured that a significant portion of their funds are being ploughed back into wildlife conservation efforts. These efforts are not only promoting the long-term welfare of Namibia’s wildlife, but also creating strong bonds between rural communities and the value they place on their wildlife resources.